History of City Planning of Bangkok

The Comprehensive City Planning of Bangkok was first started in 2503 by the Thai government who hired Litchfield Whiting Bowne & Associates from the United States to carry out the Greater Bangkok Plan 2533 or commonly known as Litchfield plan. This plan included a map of land use, a map of transportation and a map of infrastructure projects, covering the areas of the border cities of Bangkok, like Thonburi, Nonthaburi and Samut Prakan. The duration of the plan was 30 years.

 

Later in the year 2514 the Department of Public Works and Urban Planning improved the layout to accommodate for the increased population from the original 2533 City Map plan. This improvement will cover the border cities of Bangkok, like Thonburi, Nonthaburi and Samut Prakan. The duration of the plan remains the same, 2533.

 

In 2518 there was an enactment which gives authority to force designations. Therefore the Department of Town and Country Planning developed a comprehensive city planning for Bangkok. This development, allowed by the Regulation No. 116, 2535. This comprehensive Plan included land use map set by the classification of usage and communication and transportation map. This comprehensive Plan will cover only specific area of Bangkok.

 

Before the period of enforcement of the city planning of Bangkok (Regulation No. 116, 2535) would expire, Bangkok as a local authority has made the 1st improvement to the comprehensive city planning of Bangkok as by Regulation No. 414. This updated comprehensive Plan besides including land use map set by the classification of usage and communication and transportation map also included unused land.

 

Before the period of enforcement of the city planning of Bangkok (Modifier 1) would expire, Bangkok has made a comprehensive plan Bangkok (Update No. 2) and announced that this comprehensive plan would apply as a ministerial regulation called Bangkok Comprehensive Plan 2549.This new version has added a floor area ratio requirement (Floor Area Ratio or FAR) and the open space ratio (OSR) as well as the condition that the total floor area ratio could be increased (FAR Bonus) in case of more open space for public use or if there is more space for car parking in the area around public transport stations.